Jump to content


Photo

Spring Marathon Training Thread

new thread for a new year

  • Please log in to reply
192 replies to this topic

#181 markiemo

markiemo

    Director of Group Runs

  • Board Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3651 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Trail running, biking, hanging with reptiles, camping, traveling,
    beach bumming, enjoying the endless string of Saturdays...

Posted 21 April 2013 - 07:31 PM

Sarah, though I don't race much anymore I know exactly what you are going through. 

The hay is in the barn.  You've been training like a rock star and your body is rebelling.

 

Take a deep breath and go out here and enjoy the benefits of all your hard work.

 

Good luck and have FUN.



#182 Julie

Julie

    Reptile Runner

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 827 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Brush Prairie

Posted 21 April 2013 - 07:54 PM

Sarah, You have trained hard for this. You have a solid race plan. There are a million things that can and do go wrong. I am the the worst at tapering. I just want to stop and rest completely. So far I'm holding it together. I like that feeling of running when I am very fit at the end of a training session. Really enjoying how easy it feels but not enjoying not being able to run harder. My target for Eugene is 3:25. That isn't going to be a PR, but it would be solid with my current level of fitness. I ran a 3:24 in Houston january 2012 with higher mileage training plan. (Pfitzinger)

#183 lmtortor

lmtortor

    Reptile Runner

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 753 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Running, rock-climbing, biking, camping, playing piano/singing, eating ice cream

Posted 23 April 2013 - 05:19 PM

Whoa. Just realized it's been two weeks since I posted.

For some reason, after that beefy MP run, I was struggling w some major self doubt and was just in a funk all around. No good reason. Thankfully, for the last 7 days or so, I have been in that really sweet place where my head is totally in it and ready to rock, and my legs are feeling strong and springy.


I'm thinking the fitness I gained in those last few weeks of really intense training is just catching up to me now. Which is pretty sweet timing.It also helped to look at my log book and focus on the good workouts, the satisfaction of some high-mileage weeks, and really try to shut out the sub par workouts and days where I really kinda disliked running. Ok maybe even a few days where I hated it (gasp!).


Ready to roll on Sunday! I'm hoping to be parked on a patio at a brew pub Sunday afternoon, so hopefully I can catch up w some of you then.

#184 Julie

Julie

    Reptile Runner

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 827 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Brush Prairie

Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:16 PM

I'm having a mentally miserable week. Like Andi, I lost a beloved kitty this week.

I don't know how the grief will effect me. I have trained hard. I'm not eating much because of the grief and I'll take Andi's cautionary tale about sleep to heart and focus on that.

Mental preparation. Here are some of the things I do.

1. Imagine putting my head in a hat 2 inches above my head so I don't lose my posture and form when I'm tired
2. It usually feels just as good to start running faster as it does to slow down. There is some science to this one..recruiting some fast twitch muscles for a while can help give slow twitch muscles a break, however fast twitch muscles use more glycogen so only do this while taking in more fuel. It won't work if there are fueling issues.
3. I really like to imagine animals running or being in a fast car or doing a zhumba dance. It makes me feel lighter to imagine myself doing a different activity.
4. When it gets really gross I sometimes tell myself "this is what you came for"
5. I use the word "Glide" to calm myself down and get up hills. Sometimes I use "float" or "fly". When I run into the wind I use the word "wedge" and I imagine my nose like a wedge cutting through the wind effortlessly. "glide" and "wedge" really work, I swear!
6. I don't try to calculate the mileage in front of me...I try to focus on the pavement that I've already put behind me. I try to think about things I passed or missed in the previous mile.

#185 lmtortor

lmtortor

    Reptile Runner

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 753 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Running, rock-climbing, biking, camping, playing piano/singing, eating ice cream

Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:40 PM

Julie, sorry it has had been a bad week for you.  Do your best this weekend.  Letting yourself grieve is important.  I hope you are able to get some good sleep this week.

 

Such great advice.  I am going to have to add these to my mental list of go-to's when I am hating life on Sunday.



#186 allezvita

allezvita

    motivationally challenged

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6677 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:West Linn, OR
  • Interests:running, dogs, travel, good beer, good wine, good food

Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:01 PM

Oh, Julie. I'm so sorry. One foot in front of another. 

 

All I ever remember is listening to Nikki give me an 8 count. I can count it any way I want, I just have to count. 


"unless you're doing chest compressions, you always have time to go to the bathroom"

"bonum certamen certavi, cursum consumavi, fidem servavi"
I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept my word


Plan your dive, dive your plan

when life gives you lemons, add booze

#187 Fidel

Fidel

    Tyrannosaurus Rex

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4197 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lafayette

Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:20 PM

Julie, I can relate to #2. I don't remember which year but at one of the Vancouver Lake Half's, I ran the first 8 miles at a really slow pace (cuz I was not in half shape) but at 9 miles, just when i started to cramp, I cranked it up and felt really good. The cramping went away and it felt good passing other runners who were dying. I think i ran the last 5k in 20min for a total time of 1:35. Imagine if I would have been in distance shape!

#188 loof

loof

    Squeak-free at mile 26.3.

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6047 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Here

Posted 24 April 2013 - 08:00 PM

Julie, I'm sorry to hear about your cat. You give great advice -- I remember what you said about wind long ago on a run I did with you, and it still sticks with me. So thanks for that. 

 

do3nyr.jpg

 

 

#189 andicamp

andicamp

    showing my colors

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3488 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:brooklyn, pdx
  • Interests:yes

Posted 24 April 2013 - 08:15 PM

Julie, so sorry for your loss. I wish I had some great pearls of wisdom for you, having just gone through it myself, but I'm not sure I handled it all that well.

Focusing on sleep is a great idea. Also, in regard to food..  even if you're not able to eat as much, try to make sure that the food you are eating is as clean as possible. When I was grieving, I managed to eat, but couldn't really motivate to cook, so my food choices were not particularly stellar. So I was eating, but I was not feeling too terrific. 

 

This part is not specific to Julie and it might sound totally obvious, but I find that I run best when I go into a race fully expecting it to hurt. I mean, that's what races are for, right? If you aren't hurting at some point, you're not racing, you're just running. So expect it, embrace it, and know that hurting is your reward for all the hard work you've done, because it means you are pushing out against your previous boundaries, stretching them as far as you can. Hug the hurt, welcome it with open arms.

 

Please don't misconstrue the previous statements as license to go out too hard in a marathon. You should only need these things LATER. :)


2010 mileage: 2929
2009 mileage: 2875
2008 mileage: 2436.5
2007 mileage: 2254.5
2010 prs/races: 1/7
2009 prs/races: 15/18
2008 prs/races: 12/17
2007 prs/races: 9/11

#190 billa

billa

    Don't call it a comeback; I've been here for years.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1254 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North/St. Johns <---

Posted 29 April 2013 - 02:08 PM

Julie- You ran a helluva a race considering where your head was last week. Congrats. You too Lisa. And Lou. And everyone else who trained and gave it all they had out there yesterday. Eugene has really become the premiere event in our region.

 

W/E  4/28:

 

M - 6.5 - 6:43 (w/6x100 strides in mile 4 - 5:49)

T - 9.0 - 6:43 (3 up, 4x800 @ HMP w/400 jog - 2:50, 2:50, 2:46, 2:46)

W - 11.0 - 6:57

T - OFF

F - 4.0 - 6:45

S - 2.5 - 6:49

S - 19.0 - Eugene Half 74:20/5:40

 

TOTAL: 52.0

 

Berlin Marathon - 22 weeks to go

 

I jotted on the Eugene thread about that half. My quads feel like I just raced a hilly 30K, not the Eugene Half. I rested about as much as a person can rest going into that thing (not just this week, but the past 6 weeks), and still felt only about 90% "with it" out on the course. You know, good but not invincible. Recovery and tapering are mysterious things. Well, come to think of it, so is running in general. I feel just as confident going into halfs in the middle of big mileage marathon buildups (with short, quick tapers) as I do with the method I just tried.

 

Fun fact: in 1988, at age 16, I ran 74:38 at a legit July 4th half on Coronado Island in San Diego. My time yesterday was 18 seconds faster. While the 1988 race was a PR and yesterday was far from one (PR is 72:18), I'm amazed I've gotten back to that time, 25 years later now. Of course, when I was 16 it didn't take 100 mile weeks, drills, early bed times, and endless dedication. I trained a lot back then, just not like this.


thru 4/21/2014 -
lifetime race count: 626
lifetime 1/2 marathon count: 
50
lifetime marathon count: 31 

PERSONAL RECORDS

BLOG

#191 andicamp

andicamp

    showing my colors

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3488 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:brooklyn, pdx
  • Interests:yes

Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:48 PM

I've been in rest/recovery mode for the past two weeks. I'm just starting to run again (2 days last week, 4 days this week), but the break has been good for me (and for my yard!). I'm starting to get excited about running again, although I'm still feeling the effects of the glitch, in that all up and down the back of my right side is tight and a little sore. I will definitely be making a few trips to the PT over the next few weeks to make sure I'm back on the right path.

 

But I'm posting now to do kind of a lessons learned thing for this past training cycle. 

 

You might think that since my race was crappy, I'd be looking to my training for answers. That is not the case. I think my training went great.

I'm extremely happy with the system I worked out for myself. The mix of workouts was awesome, the training paces were challenging but manageable, and the overall training load felt pretty damn good.

 

I liked the two week cycles. The one specific thing I learned in relation to them, however, was that if I want to feel good for a tune up race (and I always do want that, or I wouldn't bother racing), the race needs to fall one week after the end of a two week cycle. I need to finish the two week cycle, and then have a third week as my cutback week, in other words. When I did that for my first tune up race, I felt awesome, when it didn't work out like that for second tune up race, my legs were tired and flat. One week after that second tune up race, however, my legs felt like a million bucks. I would have loved to have those legs on race day.

 

I got fit faster than I expected. In general, I'm not a fan of long training cycles for marathons. I wasn't trying for some super long cycle this time either, but I did give myself a little extra time because it had been so long since I'd really trained for a marathon, so I thought I might need a few extra weeks. I did not. I felt ready to taper about 4-5 weeks out. There's only so much fitness you can gain (in my experience) in any one training cycle, and I knew I was there about a week before Shamrock. This might be partly due to the fact that instead of building mileage gradually over 8-10 weeks with one or two peak weeks, I basically raised my mileage to my top level as fast as I safely could, and then just stayed there (other than my rest weeks) the whole time. I really liked that part actually. All 4 or 5 of my easy days each week were 10 miles a day for at least 8 weeks. I really liked having the mileage level be routine. I definitely plan to stick with that.

 

The glitch/ancillary work was my downfall. I fell into the routine of doing extensive stretching/strengthening after my morning easy runs during the week, but not doing much of anything after my evening runs or (gasp!) weekend runs. I think I could get away with being lazy after my evening runs because I was taking such good care of my body in my morning routines, but not taking care of myself on the weekends was a disaster waiting to happen. The glitch first reared its ugly head when I ran my last hard long run (about 4 weeks out) on a Saturday, felt some tightness and didn't get right on it. I have no one to blame for that but myself. I'm not trying to be unrealistic about it. I don't think I need to spend an hour a day stretching, but I need to spend 5-15 minutes afterwards doing the things I know I need to do. There's no getting around it. And it's not like I hate doing that stuff, it actually feels pretty good, I just have to do it before I sit down with my dinner, because it's probably not happening after that.

 

And, I guess this wouldn't be complete without a little forward thinking....

My tentative plan right now is to get back to normal non-marathon training level (~70 miles a week, maybe a little bit more) and stay there until Hood to Coast. After Hood to Coast, I will take a couple of weeks of easy running, and provided the motivation is there (and who knows about that), I'll start training for CIM.

I have a little unfinished business with that race. 


2010 mileage: 2929
2009 mileage: 2875
2008 mileage: 2436.5
2007 mileage: 2254.5
2010 prs/races: 1/7
2009 prs/races: 15/18
2008 prs/races: 12/17
2007 prs/races: 9/11

#192 BrianD

BrianD

    Leapin' Lizard

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 630 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SE PDX

Posted 03 May 2013 - 08:33 AM

First and foremost, congrats to all the Eugene folks for races well run.  One of these years, I'd love to come down and take on this event as it's likely the only way I'm doing a non-trail Oregon marathon.  Sounded like an amazing day for everyone involved!

 

Second, Andi that sounds like a very rational analysis of your training cycle.  I'd expect nothing less from an engineer :-)  Seriously though I can easily point to my ancillary work (and stretching after every run) as being the main reason I was able to take on a higher volume this training cycle.  It was really hard some days to get it in even in an adaptive format but as long as I got something in I definitely felt a difference.  Of course, I don't think Chad has stretched ever so to each their own :-)

 

I also thought of all of us and our training when reading this:  http://www.irunfar.c...nd-running.html  I really wish I'd read this during my slump in training; would have made me feel better about things moving forward and just adapting things to my body's ability to handle everything going on around me.

 

Ok, onto the final training log entry; I'm mainly posting this because I know LT was curious how I handled the two marathons in 13 day process.  I'll write up something on Big Sur soon but given it was treated as a glorified long run/victory lap by Chad and myself, there aren't quite as many gory details :-)  In short, the general plan was to do just enough running to get the soreness of Boston out but to leave the legs fresh for the hills of Big Sur.  I used Higdon's plan for two marathons in two weeks with a few tweaks here and there and for the most part it was a success.  Of course, I only knew it was a success in retrospect; during the process I certainly had my doubts :)

 

Week 20/20:

M- 6 easy w 5xhill

Tu- 7m w 3 @ MP-10 (6:23pace)

W- off

Th- 4 easy

F- travel day

Sa- 3 easy

Su- off

 

I was supposed to run Wednesday leading up to Boston but just bagged it when life got in the way.  At that point I knew (or at least told myself) that it was way more important to get rest vs. a few extra miles.

 

Week 21/20:

 

M- 26.2  fast :-)

Tu- 2 v easy

W- off

Th- 3 easy

F- lockdown & travel day all in one

Sa- 6 easy

Su- off

 

The general plan I'd put together had me going 6 on saturday and 8-10 v easy on sunday.  However after running 6 on saturday coupled with going for a 3 mile walk with a friend, my legs were shot (quads especially were in serious levels of discomfort as I seemed to feel worse as the week went on) and psychologically I was a mess.  So instead I just shut 'er down and pinned my hopes on Big Sur with a 6 mile long run.  

 

Week 22/20:

 

M- off

Tu- 4.5 easy

W- off

Th- 3.5 easy

F- 3 easy

Sa- off

Su- 26.2

 

I finally got some life in my legs around Thursday (def: I could run faster than my normal easy pace for at least one mile) and suddenly felt a lot better. Sure running 26.2 miles was going to suck, but hey we were going to take it easy, no?

 

Race report to come.


"There's no such thing as bad weather, just soft people." - Bill Bowerman
"A bear with determination will defeat a dreamy gazelle every time" - s jurek
One day I may not be able to run. Today is not that day.

#193 BrianD

BrianD

    Leapin' Lizard

  • Red Lizards
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 630 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SE PDX

Posted 03 May 2013 - 08:38 AM

Oh and to hop onto Andi's train of thought:

 

Not sure where training takes me at this point.  This is the first time post-marathon where I've actually been itching to run during my self-imposed week off of running post-race.  

 

I'm planning on taking the next 3-4 weeks to gradually build back up to pre-marathon mileage levels and then maybe find a race or two in June to just do for fun.  After that the rest of the summer is a crapshoot as the family and I are taking a month long trip to visit friends overseas.  Boston 2014 is certainly in the cards at the moment so I'm guessing the fall will be getting myself back into shape after far too many danishes and belgian beers this summer :-)


"There's no such thing as bad weather, just soft people." - Bill Bowerman
"A bear with determination will defeat a dreamy gazelle every time" - s jurek
One day I may not be able to run. Today is not that day.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users