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Hernia Surgery


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#16 SusanB

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 07:44 PM

Pdx280: I've actually lost contact with that friend over the years.  She was a good work friend who ended up moving away the next year and then we just lost touch.  So, I'm not sure how her husband is doing now.  Sorry I don't have any additional info.  



#17 Rick Lovett

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 10:56 PM

Has anyone here had hernia surgery with mesh implant? A friend's husband had bilateral hernia surgery with mesh implants and it has been a really slow healing process. He has had a hernia repair in the past without the mesh and was able to get back to track workouts within a couple of months, but this surgery isn't healing as quickly. He is a good runner and would like to get back to track workouts and racing. He was just wanting an idea of a time line for when he could expect to be able to tolerate workouts again. It still feels like the mesh is pulling when he tries to run. Any advice would be helpful.


Darn, I missed this when it first appeared. I have a friend who's had something like 8 of these surgeries, and written about them. That said, he's now in his 90s, so his experience wasn't recent. Contact me by pm if this is still relevant.

#18 pdx280

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 11:03 AM

Reviving an old thread about a problem that's still around, for some.  I just had my hernia repair mesh removed by Dr. Peter S. Billing, of Eviva in Shoreline, WA.  Took me 2+ years to find the right person.  He's been removing mesh for eight years.  His first case was someone with Bard 3D Max mesh.  Mine was Bard Softmesh.  Mine was very inflamed and probably has been since it was implanted.

 

The unofficial word among surgeons who do hernia mesh repair is that people with low body fat sometimes have problems with mesh.  But many surgeons won't mention that until you come back with problems.  Low body fat typically results from high activity.  So the real correlation might be that very active people more often have problems with mesh.  So, beware if you're contemplating getting a hernia fixed.  Find a surgeon who follows his patients in the long-term, beyond the first month or two, and knows that his patients are happy with the work, not just tolerating it.



#19 Tim

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 02:34 PM

Reviving an old thread about a problem that's still around, for some.  I just had my hernia repair mesh removed by Dr. Peter S. Billing, of Eviva in Shoreline, WA.  Took me 2+ years to find the right person.  He's been removing mesh for eight years.  His first case was someone with Bard 3D Max mesh.  Mine was Bard Softmesh.  Mine was very inflamed and probably has been since it was implanted.

 

The unofficial word among surgeons who do hernia mesh repair is that people with low body fat sometimes have problems with mesh.  But many surgeons won't mention that until you come back with problems.  Low body fat typically results from high activity.  So the real correlation might be that very active people more often have problems with mesh.  So, beware if you're contemplating getting a hernia fixed.  Find a surgeon who follows his patients in the long-term, beyond the first month or two, and knows that his patients are happy with the work, not just tolerating it.

Timely resurrection. I've had an inguinal hernia for a very long time, and only now is it getting to the point where I might want to deal with getting it repaired. Being an avid runner (obviously), what are some things I should know, look out for, ask about, etc. while I go about finding the right MD to do the surgery?

 

You mention having your mesh removed. What was done in it's place to keep the hernia repaired?


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#20 pdx280

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 03:43 PM

Apparently, the original hernia will often scar over under the mesh.  When the mesh is removed, there's no hernia.  I was lucky in that Dr. Billing found no hernia on either side after both pieces were removed.  So I'm left with no hernias, and a small scrap of mesh buried down over some critical veins and nerves, that was too dangerous to remove.  Like I'm back to zero after three years.

 

It's very very common when having laparoscopic repair via mesh implantation that the surgeon will do both sides, even though the other side had no symptoms of a hernia.  There is almost always some small defect that will justify a prophylactic mesh placement.  That's what they teach at this time to most new surgeons.  The area where the mesh is placed will shrink and flatten.  I think that's another reason they do both sides it give a balanced final product.  So, if you do go for a visit, take note if you hear the standard words, and press him or her for more detail, ask if they've ever repaired a runner who does your mileage, and actually know for a fact that they are back to running well again.  Many people don't go back to the original surgeon who did their repair, if they have problems, because the surgeon failed.  Why go back to the person who screwed you up?

 

So your typical office visit will have a description of the laparoscopic procedure, maybe a sample of the mesh, a description of how laparoscopy is better than open because they can "examine" the other side, and fix it if they find something.  But, as I said, they can always find something so everybody ends up with a bilateral repair.  I've never heard of anybody waking up to find that only one side had been done and that the other side had been explored.

 

If I was starting from scratch I would find a surgeon who will honestly answer questions about former patients, and who really knows about their former patients.  It's very difficult to find them though because each visit costs a copay and most surgeons don't follow-up beyond a month or two.  Even though the mesh is considered to be permanent.  I was close to trying to work my way in to the Timbers organization but instead found a surgeon who had had a hernia himself.  He referred me to a laparoscopic surgeon but I found out later it wasn't the surgeon who did his and his was done via open surgery.  I ended up with the standard mesh placement, both sides.  I had a very normal and common laparoscopic procedure from a skilled surgeon.  I didn't have a recurrence, so it was considered a success, although I had discomfort from just a month out.

 

I'm very cynical, and skeptical, about the hernia repair industry.  In a clinic or hospital, hernia repair is what would be called a cash cow in the business world.  They don't make a lot of money on them but they generate a lot of cash flow.  It's fast, you can be in and out and on your way home within two hours.  But you won't find many surgeons that want to hear about problems if you have them.  And the problems are very hard to define, a lot like the original hernia problems.  I often thought, over the last three years, that I was better off with the hernia.  My repair wasn't really an improvement.

 

I could go on, with other things to look out for.  Most insurance companies pay for performance, for example.  If you don't have problems within a certain amount of time, that's a win.  Beyond a certain amount of time, your surgeon isn't really connected to you any more, the penalty window is closed.  Doctors and surgeons really put a lot of work in to the bureaucracy of the medical-insurance system today, and it wears them down.

 

In short, you are out at the tails of the bell curve, statistically speaking, based on your athleticism.  Find a surgeon who sees you that way.  Most are applying a one-size-fits-all procedure to any repair that they do.  Just make sure you don't get in to the pile with the average person who just walks to their car, and sits at a desk.  Not that there's anything wrong with that.  But you're not that type.  I'm not either.

 

If you can travel, Dr. William Meyers in Philadelphia works on many runners for "sports hernias" (which aren't really hernias, of course) and probably also does real hernias.  He knows runners.

 

Dr. Bill Brown down in California also works on athletes.  I conversed with both Dr. Meyers, at the Vincera Institute, and Dr. Brown.

 

Dr. Peter Billing's practice will work with out of state insurers, and he has eight years of experience in seeing mesh problems.  But he also uses mesh to repair hernias.  I think though, that he is very selective in how much and where he places it.  He does both open and laparoscopic.  He might also do what's called a pure tissue repair, no mesh used.  I was very impressed with him. He is a real doctor.  The patient comes first.  Not many surgeons will even consider removing mesh, it's like running a marathon, compared to a hernia repair being a 5K, but he has taken the challenge and is very good at it.  At least based on my results.  If I do get another hernia, I will be going back to him.

 

Good luck.  You might start a new thread about looking for a surgeon.  Get away from my negativity. 



#21 pdx280

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 11:04 AM

Timely resurrection. I've had an inguinal hernia for a very long time, and only now is it getting to the point where I might want to deal with getting it repaired. Being an avid runner (obviously), what are some things I should know, look out for, ask about, etc. while I go about finding the right MD to do the surgery?

 

One other way to find a surgeon, I think, is to find someone like you who has had a repair and is back to doing what they were doing before.  I actually described trying that, in my novella above.  I found the guy, my doppelganger and a good friend, but he thought the new methods were better than his old repair method so he referred me to a new method guy.  There are so many different ways to get them fixed that, unless you find somebody who can vouch for a surgeon and his/her methods, you're just gambling.  The methods and materials sound the same but the details make the difference.

 

If you do find somebody like you, who has had a hernia like yours (there are two basic kinds, direct and indirect), make sure that you quiz them about all of the things that are different for them after the fix.  One thing that was the last straw for me was ED after long-term activity, like running.  Pain, soreness, stiff abdomen like a picnic plate was inside...then ED.  The inflammation affected everything in the vicinity.  You won't find many men who will admit that they have ED.  No offense to anyone who has had a mesh repair and had or has a secret.  And if you're older and you go to the doctor with mesh-caused ED, you'll get put in to the old man with erection problems box, and offered a pill.  There is major resistance out there to acknowledging mesh-related problems.



#22 pdx280

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 05:48 PM

Some new and very well researched articles have come out recently about medical devices, including hernia repair.  The first one is very relevant to the Red Lizards, I think.  Anyone considering hernia repair should read them.  Good luck.

 

p.s. I am much better now, with the Bard Soft Light mesh removed than I was with it in.  Still damaged, but still recovering.

 

https://www.theguard....eer-dai-greene

 

https://www.theguard....s-around-world

https://www.theguard....lants-industry

https://www.theguard....ssure-implants

https://www.icij.org.../implant-files/

https://medicaldevices.icij.org/



#23 pdx280

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Posted 31 January 2019 - 06:52 PM

Somebody on a different forum posted some recent articles that show how global this issue has become, two articles linked below, from Scotland..  Anyone considering hernia repair needs to be very careful in the decisions they make.

 

I am so much better off after having the mesh removed from my state-of-the-art mesh repair, it's almost unbelievable.  Like looking back on a terrible accident and being thankful that I survived.  

 

One of these people is only 39 years old.  It's just not an "old guy" problem.  Good luck.  

 

https://www.sundaypo...ned-by-surgery/

 

https://www.sundaypo...sh-victims-too/






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