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Hernia Surgery


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#1 SusanB

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 07:37 PM

Has anyone here had hernia surgery with mesh implant? A friend's husband had bilateral hernia surgery with mesh implants and it has been a really slow healing process. He has had a hernia repair in the past without the mesh and was able to get back to track workouts within a couple of months, but this surgery isn't healing as quickly. He is a good runner and would like to get back to track workouts and racing. He was just wanting an idea of a time line for when he could expect to be able to tolerate workouts again. It still feels like the mesh is pulling when he tries to run. Any advice would be helpful.

#2 Fidel

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 07:49 PM

QUOTE (SusanB @ Aug 4 2010, 08:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Has anyone here had hernia surgery with mesh implant? A friend's husband had bilateral hernia surgery with mesh implants and it has been a really slow healing process. He has had a hernia repair in the past without the mesh and was able to get back to track workouts within a couple of months, but this surgery isn't healing as quickly. He is a good runner and would like to get back to track workouts and racing. He was just wanting an idea of a time line for when he could expect to be able to tolerate workouts again. It still feels like the mesh is pulling when he tries to run. Any advice would be helpful.


I don't have great advice except to say I have a sports hernia and this procedure was recommended for me. I chose not to have the surgery and I now manage it with massage, a very specific stretch/exercise and a good warm-up. Good luck to your friend.


#3 Tim

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 08:57 PM

Hmm, I have an inguinal (sp?) hernia that I've been dealing with for years. Based on your friend's husband's experience, I may not have the surgery. Sounds like it's worse than dealing with the hernia itself.

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#4 Melissa83

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 09:16 PM

Perhaps a bit different in the case of a female? I had an open inguinal hernia repair with the mesh almost 2 years ago and besides a very painful first weekend, had a pretty smooth recovery. My MD said the mesh repair was virtually indestructible (he said I'd tear my incision before I ruined the repair), and I was given no restrictions besides one week of no lifting (or more specifically, vacuuming of all things). I ran 6 days after surgery (with doctors approval and everything) and was back to "normal" after about 2 weeks. I can kind of relate to that "pulling" feeling (I thought I ruined the repair a few times) but that was more the incision I think. But, like I said, seems rougher on men and my hernia was pretty much asymptomatic prior to surgery. Either way, that's my experience if it's worth anything. Goodluck to your friend, but I'd probably suggest contacting his MD, I don't think the recovery is supposed to be quite that difficult (I did my homework before surgery and most of the accounts seemed to suggest 4-6 weeks max before returning to running), perhaps there are some adhesions/scar tissue pulling? Just my two cents.



#5 pdx280

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 01:56 PM

Has anyone here had hernia surgery with mesh implant? A friend's husband had bilateral hernia surgery with mesh implants and it has been a really slow healing process. He has had a hernia repair in the past without the mesh and was able to get back to track workouts within a couple of months, but this surgery isn't healing as quickly. He is a good runner and would like to get back to track workouts and racing. He was just wanting an idea of a time line for when he could expect to be able to tolerate workouts again. It still feels like the mesh is pulling when he tries to run. Any advice would be helpful.

Hello.  Do you know how your friend's husband's problem turned out?  I had the same surgery a year and a half ago and am not back to near where I was before.  Just collecting others' experiences.

 

I'm sure my name is unfamiliar.  I joined back when the Duniway Park discussions were going on.

 

Anyone else who knows hernia stuff...please comment.  The hernia repair field is shrouded in mystery.



#6 allezvita

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 01:28 PM

a lap hernia with mesh repair should take about 6-8 weeks for recovery. What we all forget is that we're mortal and that that means 6-8 weeks of basically limited/light/NO activity especially bilateral repairs. At the very least, your friend should be talking with the surgeon to look for other complications or issues. Scar tissue forms differently and everyone heals differently. If it's an open surgery it can take upwards of 12 weeks. Plus it depends on what else needed to be done while intra - op. Hernia repairs are pretty bread and butter stuff but you can have more that needs to be done once you get inside. Dan's son had a hernia that was one of the largest the peds surgery PA had seen in a long time - so what can look like something simple really isn't. Surgery is surgery and you need time to recover. 

 

The hernia repair field is only shrouded in a sterile field. Not mystery. 


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#7 pdx280

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 03:54 PM

"The hernia repair field is only shrouded in a sterile field. Not mystery."  Not sure what that means.  Is it a typo?  

 

​I was hoping for real-world experiences from real people who've had the operation.  My surgeon released me for full activity at three weeks post-operation, not three months.  Functionally, I'm fine, but some things are bit off, especially post-activity.  Maybe I should have waited three months.  Where did your opinions come from?  How did Dan's son do in the long run?  (I don't know either, just asking).



#8 allezvita

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 05:35 PM

My opinions come from 25 years in medicine and 15 of which I've been a PA. I've taken care of lots of post op hernia patients (and been first assist on more than I ever wanted to). Most of the time you can go back to normal after a few weeks, but realistically, the body takes time to heal more than just the "standard". Think of it like the first day you feel good after you've had a cold. You go do all the errands you needed to do while you were laying on the couch and then you pay for it for wearing yourself out. Maybe full activity doesn't mean doing that 20 miler you put off a couple weeks while you were recovering. If you have questions, talk to your surgeon who can answer them best. 

 

I had a pretty unexciting shoulder procedure a couple years ago. I thought, hey, I'll be off until my post op visit 10 days later. I went back to work after just under two weeks off. I felt like I'd been hit by a truck and wished I'd taken at least another week off even though I felt fine. 

 

The kid is fine - but he's also 10. He didn't run most of the fall - I think he had it in September. He's doing track this spring and seems to be fine. 

 

I don't know what you mean by the typo comment. Surgery is done in a sterile field. there's no mystery about it. 


"unless you're doing chest compressions, you always have time to go to the bathroom"

"bonum certamen certavi, cursum consumavi, fidem servavi"
I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept my word


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when life gives you lemons, add booze

#9 pdx280

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 06:32 PM

Thanks for the reply.  You kind of unintentionally demonstrated the heart of the problem, I think.  The pros, you and the surgeons and others in the field. feel comfortable with what they know and the generalities that they give as advice to the patients.  Like don't lift over X lbs for X weeks, listen to your body, etc.  Because they've seen hundreds or thousands of cases and have professional training.   But the patient only knows what little they've been told and what they can pick up from the odd source.  Hence the mystery comment.  You're on the inside, I'm talking about what I see, out here.

 

I do appreciate the response.   I was trying to get a feel for what other patients have experienced.  It's a sensitive subject though, and this forum's probably too personal, as a club site.  Probably the wrong place to ask.  I'll let it fade...

 

 

 

Edited.



#10 Angela

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 08:32 AM

pdx280 - I think this is a great forum for this sort of thing.  First hand feedback from other runners that have had the surgery can be very helpful.  I tried coming back from an abdominal surgery too quickly and gave myself a hernia. Thankfully small and not overly problematic so no surgery needed.  I do appreciate reading others experiences and for what it's worth my lesson would be to listen to your body and let it recover on it's on timeline.    



#11 pdx280

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 08:40 AM

Thanks for the post.  I did and have been listening to my body but it's been messing with me.  First it says "everything's fine, go for it", then it says "you shouldn't have done that".  And I keep falling for it, like Charlie Brown does with Lucy.

 

I think that there's probably enough experience out there that somebody could put a rehab plan together, like they do for common surgeries like ACL repair, and other joint damage.  But I think that the downside to a poor hernia repair rehab isn't low enough for the industry to bother with.  With an ACL if you don't rehab it right you're back to zero, or down at 10% with a joint full of scar tissue.  With hernia surgery, you can hover at around 60-70%, and that's "close enough".  If there's no recurrence, there's no problem.  Recurrence is the industry metric.  I'm a cynic.



#12 Melissa83

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 02:35 PM

Thanks for the post.  I did and have been listening to my body but it's been messing with me.  First it says "everything's fine, go for it", then it says "you shouldn't have done that".  And I keep falling for it, like Charlie Brown does with Lucy.
 
I think that there's probably enough experience out there that somebody could put a rehab plan together, like they do for common surgeries like ACL repair, and other joint damage.  But I think that the downside to a poor hernia repair rehab isn't low enough for the industry to bother with.  With an ACL if you don't rehab it right you're back to zero, or down at 10% with a joint full of scar tissue.  With hernia surgery, you can hover at around 60-70%, and that's "close enough".  If there's no recurrence, there's no problem.  Recurrence is the industry metric.  I'm a cynic.


Rehab programs are individualized for all injuries--while there are some general themes with ACL recoveries, to get to 100%(which most choose not to), the program is individualized.

If the hernia has been repaired, there are other structures bothering you, secondary to this injury. My recommendation, because I am one, is go find a good physical therapist to assess those impairments and get you a plan to get you to 100%.

It's easy to be cynical, but you've got to be your own advocate and seek solutions, which, can sometimes be challenging (it took me 5 years to find someone who believed an early 20 something girl had a hernia, when, in fact, it's
Not uncommon).

#13 pdx280

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 05:04 PM

It's easy to be cynical, but you've got to be your own advocate and seek solutions, which, can sometimes be challenging (it took me 5 years to find someone who believed an early 20 something girl had a hernia, when, in fact, it's
Not uncommon).

Thanks for the advice.  And please don't take this the wrong way, but you've argued both sides of the argument.  

 

We're responsible for our own welfare.  BUT our giant modern medical marvel machine couldn't even diagnose a common injury.  What's an individual to do?  My argument is that we have a deficiency in the system, where much useful information is left to waste.  Common injuries have common symptoms and and should have common remedies, up to a point.  Of course there are individual factors, but we all have essentially the same bodies.

 

The comment about most choosing not to get back to 100% is interesting.  I have a theory that once a person has been way down at the bottom, injured, they're just happy to get back to 70 or 80%.  Which a person should be.  But it's a waste to leave somebody at 70% when with a little good advice they could be at 90%.  Or to have an individual waste a year figuring out to heal themselves, listening to their body, when the collected experience of thousands of former patients could probably cut it down to, say, 6 months.  There's just a lot of unnecessary suffering out there, in my opinion.  I'm basically refusing to accept the status quo.

 

But back to the main question - how did your hernia repair go?  5 years to find it, is it fixed yet?



#14 Melissa83

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 07:08 PM

You've got to surround yourself with a good healthcare team. Easier said than done sometimes, but they're out there and they're the ones that want to find resources to help get you to 100%. There may be some frustrating trial and error involved in this, but there's likely a solution out there.

As to the 100% thing, most people don't want to put in the work or make sacrifices.

I posted on the original post in 2010- scroll up and my story is there, but zero issues since writing that. I had an absurdly easy recovery (even the surgeon was surprised) but I think I tend to recover quickly from most things. I suspect being well educated in rehab and pretty determined/stubborn/tough/dumb play a role in that.

#15 pdx280

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 07:32 PM

Didn't realize that was you, coming back.  How does a person surround themselves with a team?  Let alone a good one?  How do you know who's good?  

 

Age could be a factor, I'd guess.  Younger is better.

 

I have another theory that only people who've had a good experience want to talk about their experience.  Notice that there are no men replying (although it's soon and not an interesting topic), even though it's a very common surgery for men. 20-25% will eventually have some form of hernia, "they" say.

 

I'm actually doing well, but now that I'm in the group, I'm just surprised at how poor the after-surgery advice and care is.  I've always been healthy and this is the first surgery, besides tonsils at 8, that I've ever had.  Have to say, before the surgery I was always of the mind that a person has to take care of themselves.  But some things are just too big to handle alone.  Things should be better.

 

At least you recognized the absurdity.  Your sub-conscious knows you're one of the lucky ones.  I'm looking for experiences across the spectrum of good to bad.






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